HIMA Logo

The Hebb Institute of Martial Arts is extremely proud of its logo. The logo that you see pictured above was designed by Marco Bustamante, a highly skilled graphic design professional, Magda Institute staff teacher, and personal friend. HIMA wishes to publicly acknowledge and thank Marco Bustamante for his excellent work.

Marco’s extensive questionnaire, depth of martial arts understanding, and creative and skillful application and implementation of graphic design principles and techniques produced a graphic image that clearly identifies what HIMA is about.

Knowing this, however, you should understand that our logo is so much more than just a graphic image which identifies our Institute. While our logo is definitely intended to attract attention and make a lasting impression, it is even more concerned with conveying the appropriate meaning or sense of our Institute.



The Meaning …

… is in the colors and components.

The logo colors (black, gold, red, and white) were chosen for two reasons – allegiance to the flag and representative symbolism.

The logo components (yin and yang symbol with ascending and descending arrows, kris, square, two-dimensional right angles, and small triangles) were chosen for their representative symbolism as well as for their ability to represent and/or hide shapes. Shapes appear as themselves or as concepts hidden within the components. Shapes, whether obvious or hidden, were also chosen for their representative symbolism.



The Colors

As stated earlier, allegiance to the flag was one reason for the color choices. HIMA’s founder is a die-hard Marylander. Adopting the colors of the Maryland state flag is his way of showing his Maryland spirit and paying homage to his roots.

Secondarily, the logo colors were chosen because of their representative symbolism. Representative symbolism simply means that the colors convey certain meanings that have particular significance to HIMA and its students.

It is this representative symbolism that uncovers the hidden meanings and allows the observer to gain a much deeper appreciation of the Hebb Institute of Martial Arts as well as the breadth and depth of the personal growth and development that will take place at HIMA.

While each color symbolically represents a variety of attributes, qualities, or values, we will address only our top three symbolic representations for each color.

Black

In the HIMA logo, black represents authority, respect, and transformation.

Black can be seen as the color of authority as evidenced by the fact that the senior Highland Regiment of the British Army is known as the Black Watch. Since HIMA is committed to being the four-state region’s authority on Jeet Kune Do, Kali and Pentjak Silat, black represents authority.

In Japanese culture, black is associated with honor. Since HIMA wants its students to show respect to themselves, the arts, the training facilities, training partners, classmates, teachers, parents, siblings, school visitors, and all others they come in contact with, black represents respect.

Native Americans associate black with soil. Since soil provides the foundation for plant growth, it is representative of life. HIMA fervently believes that personal growth and development will not only add vivacity to your life, but that it will transform your life. Since HIMA believes that martial arts are the perfect vehicle for achieving personal growth and development, black represents transformation.

Gold

In the HIMA logo, gold represents culture, history and protection.

The meaning of culture is derived from the Chinese flag where the golden color symbolizes the culture of the Chinese people. From the cultural perspective, the color gold represents our commitment to teaching students something about the culture of the countries that influence our arts. Furthermore, it signifies our commitment to creating a culture of learning at our Institute.

The meaning of history is also derived from the Chinese flag where the golden color also symbolizes the history of the Chinese people. From the historical perspective, the color gold represents our commitment to teaching students something about the history of the countries that influence our arts. Furthermore, it signifies our commitment to creating a lasting history of our own.

The golden color in the Malaysian flag represents the royal color of Sovereign, the country's protectors and rulers. For us, gold symbolizes protection. The martial arts that we teach, while certainly a means to foster personal growth and development, will provide you with the confidence and skills to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Red

In the HIMA logo, red represents courage, passion, and sacrifice.

The meaning of courage is derived from the Indonesian flag where one historical account relates that the red color represented the blood that was shed in the War of Independence against the Dutch. For us, red represents the courage to face fears and obstacles with the confidence and boldness needed to overcome them.

Different peoples (Greeks and Hebrews) and modern science (psychology) have associated red with passion. For us, red symbolizes the enthusiasm about the martial arts that we hope to generate in you as well as the zeal that we strive to exhibit when teaching and/or talking about martial arts.

The Philippine flag was first conceptualized by General Emilio Aguinaldo in 1897 during his exile in Hong Kong, drawing inspiration from the flags used by the Katipunan and the Cuban revolutionaries. It has been common since the 1960s to trace the development of the Philippine flag to the various war standards of the individual leaders of the Katipunan, a pseudo-masonic revolutionary movement that opposed Spanish rule in the Philippines and led the Philippine Revolution. The red is symbolic of the sacrifices (blood and life) made by the revolutionaries. For us, red represents the sacrifices of blood, sweat and tears (hopefully only figurative tears) that will be necessary to grow and develop as a martial artist and person.

White

In the HIMA logo, white represents clean and kind character, purity of intent, and religion.

The Jalur Gemilang or Stripes of Glory is the flag of Malaysia. The flag’s anthem associates the white in the flag with a clean and kind character. For us, white represents the virtuous and benevolent spirit that we want to comprise the culture of our Institute. We want our students and staff to embody this spirit.

The meaning of purity of intent is derived from the Indonesian flag where one historical account relates that the white color could be understood to symbolize the purity of the Indonesians. For us, white represents the purity of our intentions to pass on the teachings of our martial arts, as well as the purity of your intentions for wanting to learn the martial arts.

The meaning of religion is derived from the Thai flag. While the Thai connotation likely relates to Theravada Buddhism, for our purposes religion is a cause, principle, or activity that is pursued with zeal or conscientious devotion. Martial art is our religion in this context and we welcome it to be yours in this context as well.



The Components

As stated earlier, the logo components were chosen because of their representative symbolism and for their ability to represent and/or hide shapes.

While each component clearly has a shape of its own, certain components may hide other shapes. The symbolic representations relating to the components may be categorized into the obvious and the obscure. In regards to the obvious symbolic representations, only one idea will be highlighted. When addressing the obscure symbolic representations, three depictions will be detailed.

Yin / Yang Symbol with Ascending and Descending Arrows

In the HIMA logo, the Yin / Yang Symbol with Ascending and Descending Arrows represents Jeet Kune Do, HIMA’s heart, and HIMA’s lineage.

The Yin / Yang Symbol with Ascending and Descending Arrows is part of the Jeet Kune Do logo. The Chinese characters are all that is missing. Consequently, for us, the Yin / Yang Symbol with Ascending and Descending Arrows is meant to symbolize Jeet Kune Do.

The Yin / Yang Symbol with Ascending and Descending Arrows is at the center of our logo to signify that Jeet Kune Do is the heart of the system we teach. As a student of Sifu Cass Magda, the HIMA founder teaches the Magda Institute’s curriculum. Jeet Kune Do is at the core of the Phase Curriculum.

Furthermore, the presence of the Yin / Yang Symbol with Ascending and Descending Arrows is intended to honor or pay homage to HIMA’s lineage. HIMA’s founder is a 3rd generation Jeet Kune Do lineage student. Bruce Lee taught Dan Insosanto (1st generation). Sifu Dan Inosanto taught Cass Magda (2nd generation). Sifu Cass Magda teaches Ron Hebb (3rd generation).

The Yin / Yang Symbol as a Circle

The circle is obvious to some, but not to others because it is but a part of the yin / yang symbol with ascending and descending arrows.

On the surface, the circle represents footwork patterns that may be seen in our arts. ¼-turn footwork that may be used in Jeet Kune Do becomes a circle if four successive ¼ turns are made in the same direction. The Numerado exercise from the Villabrille-Largusa Kali system utilizes the circle. Repetitious use of the “U” pattern found in the Harimau system produces a circle.

On a deeper level, the circle represents infinity, growth and development, and the source of knowledge.

A circle has no specific beginning or ending. It is continuous; never-ending. For us, the study of martial arts is continuous and never-ending. To us, the martial arts are boundless tools for learning.

One form of circle symbolism present in the Native American culture is the medicine wheel or sacred hoop. The sacred hoop contains cardinal directions which represent various stages of growth and enlightenment. By Native American customs, the soul must pass through these stages to complete the "Good Red Road" of physical life.

For us, the circle represents a sacred hoop and its associated stages of growth and enlightenment. Your growth and development will progress in stages as your training moves forward. Your will grow and develop on three levels – body, mind and spirit.

In ancient Egypt, the mathematical number 0 was thought of as the number of Nut, mother of Osiris, Isis, Nephthys and Set. It was considered holy, a place where all knowledge came from. For us, martial arts are wonderful sources of knowledge. Your rigorous training will increase your mental, physical and spiritual knowledge.

The Kris

In the HIMA logo, the kris represents mindset, uniqueness, and initiation.

The kris represents two different aspects of the HIMA mindset – one aspect applies to training and the other applies to the idea of a living entity.

To understand how the kris relates to HIMA’s training mindset, you must understand the significance of the tip of the blade pointing down. Traditionally, this signifies ‘to the death.’ Our intent is to signify the mindset of our martial arts training. Our training will place serious demands on your body, mind and spirit, which will challenge your intestinal fortitude. Meeting this challenge requires steadfast commitment. This commitment is symbolically meant to be analogous to the commitment required in a battle ‘to the death.’

To understand how the kris relates to the idea of a living entity, you must understand the significance of an edged weapon. An edged weapon can symbolize aliveness or living. If an edged weapon is involved in the confrontation, senses will be overly heightened and you will feel “alive.” For HIMA, the kris is meant to symbolize that our arts are alive. Our arts are constantly being researched and tested in an effort to continue their evolution.

The kris also represents two different aspects of HIMA’s uniqueness – one aspect applies to the uniqueness of our roots and the other applies to our programming uniqueness.

The kris is a distinctive, asymmetrical dagger indigenous to Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and southern Thailand. These lands are home to the unique arts of Silat, Bersilat, Kali, and Muay Thai. Since these arts are part of the HIMA curriculum, the kris is the perfect symbol of the unique Southeast Asian influences in our curriculum.

As alluded to above, the kris is a unique weapon. This makes it perfectly suited to represent the programming uniqueness of HIMA. HIMA’s programming is unique in that it offers “Phase” and “Cultural” studies. This programming uniqueness supports HIMA’s vision of being an Institution of Higher Learning.

Lastly, the kris represents an initiation. In certain Southeast Asian cultures, a kris is given to a young male when he reaches adulthood. In this case, the kris is a symbol of the boy’s initiation into manhood. For HIMA, the kris represents an initiation into higher thinking. The principles, tactics, and strategies from our arts will foster introspection and critical thought. Consequently, your studies will cultivate higher thinking.

The Square

The gold square is obvious to some, but not to others because it is layered or suppressed behind the four red, two-dimensional right angles and the yin / yang symbol with ascending and descending arrows.

The obvious representation here relates to footwork patterns that may be seen in our arts. The ¼-turn footwork that may be used in Jeet Kune Do could create a square pattern. The square is also the geometric shape used to represent Langkah Empat in our Pentjak Silat.

Aside from the obvious, the square represents balance, grounding, and pragmatism.

The balance represented by the square is all-encompassing. It relates to the mental, physical and spiritual components of your being. Our programs of study are designed to equally develop all aspects of your being.

Grounding refers to the education, preparation and training that forms the foundation of your studies. You will quickly learn the extreme value that HIMA places on the fundamentals. The fundamentals provide the basic knowledge that will help you grow as a martial artist and a person.

Pragmatism refers to expediency, practicality, and simplicity. While you will be exposed to some idealistic elements in the Cultural Program, HIMA prides itself on teaching its students useful, realistic and straightforward self-defense techniques.

The 4 Red, Two-Dimensional Right Angles

While the four red, two-dimensional right angles are obvious, the meanings behind them are not.

A right angle is part of a triangle. So, the obvious meaning is that the right angle is representative of the triangle. For more detailed triangle specifics see below.

Beyond this basic representation, the right angles further represent the importance of fundamentals, precision, and advanced principles.

In our Pentjak Silat, Langkah Tiga is the most fundamental footwork pattern. It is also the dominant pattern in many styles of Silat. For us, it is a beginning that provides a foundation for future expansion. This is due to the fact that the triangle builds the square and the cross. In other words, two triangles make one square and four triangles make one cross. At HIMA, the fundamentals are the building blocks of the foundation that supports high-quality martial arts performance. Knowing that Langkah Tiga provides the knowledge to create Langkah Empat and Langkah Lima should clearly demonstrate the importance of learning and internalizing the fundamentals.

The right angle is not 89 degrees. The right angle is not 91 degrees. The right angle is precisely 90 degrees. HIMA strives to instill the importance of precision from the outset as beginning students learn the importance of precisely striking focus mitts, Thai pads, and kicking shields, as well as precisely delivering Kali’s 12 angles of attack. Since precision is critically important in all martial arts as well as in most endeavors in life, the right angles represent this notion of precision.

The right angles are also representative of advanced formulas and principles. One such formula is the F.A.B. formula of our Pentjak Silat. This formula is an advanced concept that draws heavily on angles and allows those who truly understand the formula and have the ability to apply the formula to make takedowns nearly inescapable.

The 4 Small, Black Triangles

The four small, black triangles are obvious to some, but not to others because the triangles may be viewed as arrows, which they are also. Viewed as a triangle, they serve to represent the triangle. Viewed as arrows, they serve to elucidate the cross, which is explained below.

Again, the obvious representation relates to footwork patterns that may be seen in our arts. Curved footwork that may be used in Jeet Kune Do could create a triangular appearance. The triangle is also seen in Kali and Pentjak Silat. In Kali, it takes the form of male and female triangles. In Pentjak Silat, it takes the form of Langkah Tiga.

Beyond the obvious, the triangle represents ascension or enlightenment, the power of three, and equality and fraternity.

The triangle can be viewed as the delta glyph and symbolically represents a doorway. This depiction balances thought and emotion to provide a doorway to higher wisdom. The pyramid, a three-dimensional triangle, indicates enlightenment. In ancient Egypt, pyramids were built so that the souls of the Pharaohs could reach their resting place by travelling up the pyramid. For us, the triangle represents the pursuit of ascension or enlightenment.

Mystic teachings incorporate the power of three within their folds. For us, the triangle represents one, particularly applicable, time-honored triad – body, mind, spirit. Our programs of study and curriculum will foster the growth of body, mind, and spirit.

The triangle, as seen in the flag of the Philippines, stands for equality. For us, the triangle represents the idea that all of our students are on equal footing. We are committed to providing the finest instruction to all of our students. We will never be discriminatory in our teaching regardless of color, race, religion, etc.

The Philippine flag triangle also stands for fraternity. For us, the triangle represents the fraternity of martial arts. As a HIMA student, you are now part of a much larger organization – an international organization – known as the Magda Institute Association. Your membership in this fraternity will give you support and open doors for you.

The 4 Red, Two-Dimensional Right Angles and 4 Small, Black Triangles as a Cross

To all but the most discerning eyes and minds, the cross will be invisible. If you can’t see it, imagine that the four, small black triangles are actually arrows that indicate the absence of a connecting line. The arrows line up perfectly with the opening or space between the four red, two-dimensional right angles. Drawing connecting lines between the arrows and through the openings or spaces makes the cross become visible.

On the surface, the cross represents footwork patterns that may be seen in our arts. If four isolated images of ¼-turn footwork that may be used in Jeet Kune Do are viewed, a ‘hidden’ cross emerges. The cross is also the geometric shape used in our Pentjak Silat to represent Langkah Lima.

On a deeper level, the cross represents a union of concepts, a knightly ideal, and bravery.

In religion, the cross can represent the union of the concepts of divinity and the world, where the vertical line represents divinity and the horizontal line represents the world. For us, the cross represents Langkah Lima, which is the perfect example of a union of concepts as it combines elements of Langkah Tiga and Langkah Empat. This is another case of fundamentals paving the way for future derivations.

During the Middle Ages in Europe, the cross represented a "gentleman soldier" or member of the warrior class, such as a knight. For us, the cross represents the concept of a modern warrior who competes on the battlefield of life while upholding the values of courage, faith, honor, and loyalty.

From a military standpoint, the cross is a symbol for heroism, bravery or leadership skills. For us, the cross represents the bravery that it takes to face difficult challenges (such as choosing to study at HIMA) with un-relenting resolve.